Works

Novels



Silent We Stood
On July 8, 1860, Dallas, Texas burned. Three slaves were accused of arson and hanged without a trial. Today, most historians attribute the fire to carelessness. Texas was the darkest corner of the Old South, too remote and violent for even the bravest abolitionists. Yet North Texas newspapers commonly reported runaway slaves, and travelers in South Texas wrote of fugitives heading to Mexico. Perhaps a few prominent people were all too happy to call the fire an accident.

Blood Kin
Alongside legendary ranger captain Noah Smithwick, young Isaac Webb emerges from the Texas Revolution only to be pressed into service again, this time as the embattled new Republic's peace emissary to the Comanches. His sudden and complete immersion into the culture he's known only though its depredations is both terrifying and world-altering. A haunting novel of early Texas.

The Callings
Bison herds are dwindling on the Kansas prairie. Logan Fletcher, a young faith healer from Kentucky, works on a buffalo hunting crew. Cuts Something, an aging Comanche War chief, returns to his old home on the Pease River to revive his badger medicine. Their final clash tests the depths of Cuts Something's resolve and compels Logan to confront the brutality of the American frontier.



Non-Fiction Books



Wagonhound: The Spirit of Wyoming
Wagonhound Land and Livestock is first and foremost a working cattle operation. On its 200,000 acres, mostly in the foothills of the Laramie Mountain Range, in southeastern Wyoming, cowboys still earn their living on horseback, working cattle in much the same manner as their ancestors did more than a century ago. In this defining study, Wyman Meinzer and Henry Chappell capture the essence of the Wagonhound Way and the Spirit of Wyoming.



6666: Portrait of a Texas Ranch
The Four Sixes is not a relic, showpiece, or preserve. It's a working cattle ranch, some 290,000 acres of West Texas prairie carefully used. Here, men still earn their livelihoods on horseback, not out of blind tradition, but out of necessity. Spurs, broad-brimmed hats, and scuffed and patched boots are not fashion statements but essentials - as are loyalty, toughness, and resourcefulness.

At Home on the Range with a Texas Hunter
Bobwhites in the Texas Panhandle, prairie grouse in the Flint Hills of Kansas, Gambel's quail in New Mexico's arroyos, blue quail on the staked plains, and doves and Mearns quail in Arizona. In these lyrical essays, Henry Chappell examines the bonds that connect hunter, hunting dog, land and prey.



Selected Articles



The American Conservative
Articles and Reviews

Texas Parks & Wildlife
Feature Articles

Texas Wildlife
Columns and Selected Articles

Selected Work

Novels
"I regard Silent We Stood as being among the finest Civil War novels I have ever read"
  • David Madden, Civil War Book Review
  • "Blood Kin is historical fiction at its best."
  • Bruce Winders, Historian and Curator, The Alamo
  • "The finest book on buffalo hunting and the resulting conflict with the Comanches that I have ever read."
  • Doris R. Meredith, Roundup
  • Non-fiction Books
    "Sharp and colorful also describe the economical prose of sports and wildlife writer Henry Chappell"
  • Elaine Wolff, San Antonio Current
  • Magazine Work
    Articles and Reviews
    Feature Articles
    Columns and Feature Articles